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Author Topic: Fever can unlock autism's grip: study  (Read 56738 times)
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Birdbomb
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« on: December 02, 2007, 08:27:52 PM »

Fever can unlock autism's grip: study[/size]

CHICAGO (Reuters) - Fever can temporarily unlock autism's grip on children, a finding that could shed light on the roots of the condition and perhaps provide clues for treatment, researchers reported on Monday.

It appears that fever restores nerve cell communications in regions of the autistic brain, restoring a child's ability to interact and socialize during the fever, the study said.

"The results of this study are important because they show us that the autistic brain is plastic, or capable of altering current connections and forming new ones in response to different experiences or conditions," said Dr. Andrew Zimmerman, a pediatric neurologist at Baltimore's Kennedy Krieger Institute, who was one of the study authors.

The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, was based on 30 children with autism aged 2 to 18 who were observed during and after a fever of at least 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit.

More than 80 percent of those with fever showed some improvements in behavior during it and 30 percent had dramatic improvements, the researchers said. The change involved things like longer concentration spans, more talking, improved eye contact and better overall relations with adults and other children.

Zimmerman's team said the fever effect had been noted anecdotally in the past by parents and doctors.

Lee Grossman, president and chief executive officer of the Autism Society of America, said he had noticed it in his own son, who is now 20.

But he noted in an interview that the study's authors said expanded research was needed on the fever effect and its implications. "It's good that they've noticed this and are bringing it forward," he said.

People with autism spectrum disorders suffer in varying degrees from limited social interactions, lack of verbal and non-verbal communication and other abilities.

As many as 1.5 million Americans have some form of autism, according to ASA. It is not known what causes the condition.

Zimmerman said that while there currently is no definitive medical treatment, speech and language therapy started as soon as possible after diagnosis "can make a significant difference."

He called the fever research, headed by colleague Laura Curran, "an exciting lead" that could help point the way to a treatment that would reconnect the autistic brain. He said the fever effect was believed found only in children, whose brains are more "plastic" than those of adults.
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labrat
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« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2007, 09:25:32 AM »

I hope they can find some hope from this situation and that insurance will pay for it!
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Bonnie
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« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2008, 11:49:08 AM »


That's amazing.  You know the Kennedy Krieger Institute has an excellent reputation.  If they are backing it up; insurance should pay for it.  

Sincerely,
Bonnie
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labrat
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« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2008, 01:53:54 PM »

I'm beginning to think the people at the insurance places don't care a flip how something might help someone! :wallbash:  
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gel61820
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« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2008, 03:22:45 PM »

This is an interesting post, Donna.  It is amazing how such a slight raise in temperature could cause that difference.  I hope they continue to work on this research and see if it can give more insight into the brain.  Autism is a very heartwrenching disease and any knowledge will be a blessing.

And I agree, Labrat... seems insurance companies don't care about people anymore, it is just a different name for a collection agency!  My neighbor has had in the past 8 months:  cardiac arrest, quadruple bypass, colon cancer, surgery to remove half of his colon, chemo since Oct every week, cancer has recently spread to the lungs... and guess what?  Insurance was maxxed out in late Dec... and he is still going weekly for chemo.  They almost lost their house but thankfully their mortgage holder has a hardship department which rewrote their mortgage at a lower percentage rate.  Course he has filed for Social Security and nothing yet, and probably nothing for some time either.  My heart goes out to him and his wife because they are so distraught with all the bills coming in, but if he does not go for the treatments.... don't think I need to say any more, am sure you get my drift.  Needless to say, all of the expenses are not helping his mental attitude dealing with the cancer either.  For the 21st century, it made alot more sense when people were able to barter with their doctor a few chickens for treatment than it does now days!

 :im_033:


 
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« Reply #5 on: February 23, 2008, 04:19:41 AM »


When I was fighting Aetna for the VNS surgery; the doctor (who was helping me) asked the Aetna person what was their main objective for their company.  The Aetna person stated it was to put money into their shareholders pockets.  That is from the horses mouth!  It's all about money and not spending it to help patients have more quality of life! <_<

That answer steamed my behind!  Even an Aetna doctor I saw said that they were the worst to pay for anything!  It's pretty sad.  So, you know they are hoarding money for themselves!  Little pricks!  Now, I just wonder how much money people have that are under or in an insurance company?!

It sounds like organized crime to me.  Hoarding money for their members.  Or shareholders I should say.  I wish there could be a major investigation after hearing this news.  It just makes me wonder how much money every insurance company has that they are hiding with their,"shareholders,".  

Sincerely,
Bonnie
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labrat
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« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2008, 08:06:33 AM »

How true Bonnie, it seems like an organized crime unit!
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gel61820
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« Reply #7 on: March 19, 2008, 11:11:45 AM »

All you need to do is see their corporate offices... State Farm isn't that far from me and all I will say is that is one impressive building!  The objective in today's society for insurance companies, hospitals, clinics and almost everything we once thought were there to protect us is simply put: MONEY!  

Luckily we still have a local hospital which is not-for-profit, so they do grant charity cases for people who cannot pay.  But my neighbor, for instance, had a heart attack, quadruple heart by-pass, then found out there was colon cancer, had half the colon removed, started chemo and now it is in his lungs.  His insurance maxed out (it wasn't that high of a max), so he can no longer receive any treatments until he gets a medical card, which in this states takes around 90 days.  The dear fellow is wasting away each day and he can't even see his doctor because they owe the clinic too much since the insurance maxed out.  That is so wrong, in every aspect. My heart just goes out to them.  I just pray he lasts until the medical card arrives and it is not too late.  

Sorry, have been helping him and his wife fight the insurance companies so this really struck a chord with me.  Thanks for letting me get it off my chest.


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"Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail." Ralph Waldo Emerson

VNS implanted July 2007 for Epilepsy.  Activated August 2007.  No success, so VNS was turned off in August 2008 and COMPLETELY removed (including coils) on Nov 25, 2008.
Bernard
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« Reply #8 on: March 19, 2008, 03:01:04 PM »

I love that scene in The Incredibles when Mr. Incredible is being verbally abused by his boss at the insurance company for putting customers ahead of the company's bottom line.
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« Reply #9 on: March 18, 2009, 07:30:47 AM »

Two years ago, when my psych was still working for the local hospital, his higher ups told him to cut back on sessions with patients like me .... those getting "free" medical care, using the hospital's words. Medicaid only pays a total of, I think, 12 outpatient visits per year. Of any and all kinds of outpatient care lumped together. Anyone with chronic health problems can go through this is in a couple of months. I love how businesses who are supposed to be in the business of taking care of people's health ... are more concerned about their bottom line.  <_<

 : cat :  
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labrat
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« Reply #10 on: March 18, 2009, 07:52:22 AM »

Money talks loud, doesn't it. The patient doesn't matter. I know a person on this board that is on Medicaid and she gets substandard care and needs some things to be addressed more aggressily. :wacko:
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